Tag: Colin Barker

The Importance of Colin Barker

Mike Haynes offers a tribute to revolutionary socialist thinker and organiser Colin Barker

revolutionary reflections | Value, force, many states and other problems: part 3

In the third and final part of his essay on violence and capitalist social relations, Colin Barker insists that capitalist states cannot be theorised without recognising their multiplicity.

revolutionary reflections | Value, force, many states and other problems: part 2

In the second part of his essay on how violence and coercion are written into the core of capitalist social relations, Colin Barker explores how states modify the law of value.

revolutionary reflections | Value, force, many states and other problems: part 1

The first part of Colin Barker's essay looking at how violence and coercion are written into the core of capitalist social relations

revolutionary reflections | Notes on Capital and the State: part 3

In the concluding part of our serialisation of his 1978 essay on the state in capitalist society, Colin Barker considers the theory of the Permanent Arms Economy.

Obituary: Colin Barker

Ian Birchall remembers the life of revolutionary socialist Colin Barker.

revolutionary reflections | Notes on Capital and the State: part 2

In the second of a three part series Colin Barker continues his investigation into the relationship between capital and the state.

Colin Barker (1939-2019)

We are extremely sad to announce the death of our comrade and friend, Colin Barker. Today we republish the first section of an interview with Colin, where he reflected on his experiences in the International Socialists (IS) in the 1960s.

revolutionary reflections | Notes on Capital and the State: part 1

The relationship between the state and capital is a major problem in Marxist theory. In the first of a three part series Colin Barker investigates how Marxists have addressed this question.

‘It was like a rocket: a fantastic display’: Reflections on May ’68

In a speech to Manchester rs21, Colin Barker reflects on the “madness of May ‘68”, when, for a brief moment, everything seemed possible.