Review | Sinews of War and Trade

Mykola Macke reviews an important book which bring together the history of development in the region with the parallel evolution of world shipping routes as the life-blood of world capitalism.
Sylivia Pankhurst addressing a crowd outside the headquarters of the East London Federation of Suffragettes, Old Ford Road, Bow

Review | Sylvia Pankhurst: Natural Born Rebel

Sylvia Pankhurst's life was full of tireless activism in the cause of women's rights, anti-imperialism and the emancipation of the working class
An image of a pile of women's magazines

Review | Tomorrow Sex Will Be Good Again

Kate Bradley reviews a highly readable intervention into recent debates amongst feminists
A photo of ships in Istanbul taken in 1854

Review | A Brief History of Commercial Capitalism

Nick Evans reviews a new book that calls for a radical rethinking of the history of capitalism.
Ash (Nathaniel Curtis, left) and Ritchie (Olly Alexander) in Russell T Davies' It's a Sin.

Review | It’s a sin

It’s a Sin is a compelling account of the human suffering of the AIDS epidemic and homophobia in the 80s, but the show sometimes seems to be dodging the big political questions.

Can one person change the world?

Jack P writes about the value and limitations of two films, First Reformed and Woman at War, from an emerging genre of environmentalist lone warrior films.
Rubens: View of Het Steen in the early morning. Keywords: art Marxism Marx what is art

Cultural Marxism? A review of The Dialectics of Art

Ian Birchall reviews The Dialectics of Art, a new work by John Molyneux.

Lighting a spark: How to Blow Up a Pipeline

How to Blow Up a Pipeline gives a balanced assessment of the conditions which make strategic direct action necessary in a warming world.
Michaela Cole promo shot for I May Destroy You

Cultural commodities that got us through 2020

From Netflix binges to a new theory of 'alternative hedonism', here are the shows, films, music, and books that kept us going in 2020.

‘Climate change is a woodchipper into which metaphors are fed’

'The Uninhabitable Earth' puts forward a radical pessimism toward climate breakdown that calls for action while shying away from any critique of neoliberalism.