Nein, Nyet, No: a brief history of jazz, rock & roll, race and repression

Mitch Mitchell takes a look at the music that made racists and rulers come out in hives Jazz was the first popular music to sweep the world. The first jazz record was made in 1916 and that opened...

Review: ‘Salt of the Earth’ 60th Anniversary release

Joe Sabatini re-examines the 1951 film 'Salt of the Earth' and argues for its contemporary relevance and importance. "Anything worth learning hurts, these changes come with pain." 2014 marks the 60th anniversary of the release of...

Favourites of 2018: rs21 reviewers recommend…

Our reviewers recommend the music, films, books, exhibitions and TV they discovered in 2018.
Diego Rivera mural

Ten radical poems for National Poetry Day

Like the song says, socialism is about bread, but also roses. With the help of rs21 members we've gathered ten poems about the fight against capitalism, racism and women's oppression, and our dreams for a better...

A Farewell to Omelas: remembering Ursula Le Guin

Writer Ursula Le Guin, who died on 22 January aged 88, overturned notions of what Science Fiction should be about.

‘I was, I am, I will be’ – 100 years after the death of...

The deaths of Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht have haunted the imagination of the left for a century.

In Remembrance of ‘Alternative Comedy’

Jeremy Hardy was part of a left-wing generation who transformed British comedy and will be sadly missed.
Tom Michaelson

The flight of the young eagles – art of the Russian revolution

Mike Thompson visits Revolution: Russian Art 1917-1932 at the Royal Academy and finds amazing art in an establishment exhibition. Photo: Tom Michaelson Artists under Russia's Tsarist regime operated in a contradictory society. They had access to the...

The Other Side of the Commonwealth: ‘Emancipation Acts’ Review

Christine Bird reviews a new performance exploring Scottish links to slavery Who knew that Glasgow's Gallery of Modern Art is housed in the 18th century mansion of tobacco merchant William Cunninghame? There is not so...

On being comrades

On a night out drinking and suffering from the resulting inebriated disposition, Karl Marx and his friends Edgar Bauer and Wilhelm Liebkneckt started smashing up a number of street lanterns using a pile of...